Curator's Corner: Creatilogy by Peter Reynolds

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The sky’s no limit as the author-illustrator of The Dot and Ish winds up his Creatrilogy with a whimsical tale about seeing the world a new way, in Sky Color.

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Peter Reynolds’ first two books in his series are amazingly witty tales that have true art application... since all art begins with just a dot, or taking a line for a walk, as said by Paul Klee.

 

The Dot by Peter Reynolds

With a simple, witty story and free-spirited illustrations, Peter H. Reynolds entices even the stubbornly uncreative among us to make a mark - and follow where it takes us.

Her teacher smiled. "Just make a mark and see where it takes you."

Art class is over, but Vashti is sitting glued to her chair in front of a blank piece of paper. The words of her teacher are a gentle invitation to express herself. But Vashti can’t draw - she’s no artist. To prove her point, Vashti jabs at a blank sheet of paper to make an unremarkable and angry mark. "There!" she says. 

That one little dot marks the beginning of Vashti’s journey of surprise and self-discovery. That special moment is the core of Peter H. Reynolds’ delicate fable about the creative spirit in all of us.

 

Ish by Peter Reynolds

A creative spirit learns that thinking "ish-ly" is far more wonderful than "getting it right" in this gentle new fable from the creator of the award-winning picture book THE DOT.

Ramon loved to draw. Anytime. Anything. Anywhere.

Drawing is what Ramon does. It¹s what makes him happy. But in one split second, all that changes. A single reckless remark by Ramon's older brother, Leon, turns Ramon's carefree sketches into joyless struggles. Luckily for Ramon, though, his little sister, Marisol, sees the world differently. She opens his eyes to something a lot more valuable than getting things just "right." Combining the spareness of fable with the potency of parable, Peter Reynolds shines a bright beam of light on the need to kindle and tend our creative flames with care.

 

Last in his art basics trilogy is Sky Color; Peter Reynolds builds a gentle, playful reminder that if we keep our hearts open, and look beyond the expected, creative inspiration will come.

Marisol loves to paint. So when her teacher asks her to help make a mural for the school library, she can’t wait to begin! But how can Marisol make a sky without blue paint? After gazing out the bus window and watching from her porch as day turns into night, she closes her eyes and starts to dream.

Young and old alike, revel in the spunk and spirit of the young artists who are the main characters of Peter Reynolds’ trio. Let Vashti, Ramon and Marisol open your eyes to the marvels of a single dot, the amazing line and discovering color. Where would art be without them, AND inquisitive, inventive minds?